Does size matter?

Our week in Italy has been a lot of things.

Enlightening.

Tasty.

Rewarding.

Educational.

Fun.

I’m having trouble uploading pix from here, so I’ll share them when I get back. But meantime, there is one thing I feel I can’t ignore.

Size.

Everything here is smaller.

What does that say about us Americans?

I’ll try not to put too much judgement into this, but it’s hard to ignore.

In our apartment in Florence and now in Rome, everything is compact.

The refrigerators are small.

The drinking glasses – the largest ones are the size of our juice glasses at home. The smallest ones are the size of shot glasses.

You can’t get a ‘large’ coffee anywhere. Trust me, I tried. True, the espresso was divine, but I really crave a grande.

The cars are little – smart cars, Fiats…. and lots of motorcycles and scooters. We saw only one Hummer, 2 minivans, and 1 Jeep. Everything else was small.

The buses are little. And electric.

Portions are smaller. (Good thing, too. Trust me, I had plenty to eat!)

The Coke cans are smaller.

The people are smaller. Well, thinner, anyway.

The washing machine here at the Rome apartment is tiny. VERY cute, too. It’s a Candy.

We found kitchen cabinet hardware that we love, love, love while we were here. When the salesperson asked how many we needed, she almost fell over when I told her how many cabinets we will have.

What does this say about American lifestyles?

As we get ready to move into our new home – our larger home – I have to ask myself these things. I think I have fairly straight priorities.

But, I can’t ignore the question.

Does size matter?

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11 thoughts on “Does size matter?

  1. One of the many, many things I loved about my time in the UK was the smaller sizes of everything. And no ice in drinks. I’m weird like that.

  2. Love Italy. We stayed in a small town and found it interesting that so many people rode bicycles. The town, of course, was set up for bicycles. Many older ladies would do their shopping by riding from place to place etc. and they seemed exceedingly healthy (and is why they “…are thinner”).
    Loved going to the park at night, eating gelato, and listening to the music.
    I hope you made it to Venice – thrill of a lifetime!
    Americans could learn a lot from the Italians.

  3. I like to say everything is “just the right size” in Europe. Two weeks there and I am driving, hugging the curb; the freeways feel like I’m driving in a parking lot! And I become acutely aware of all the unnecessary packaging we slap around everything we buy. One thing we do better here is the toilet paper; gotta love the wide fluffy 2 ply. But, other than that, we could learn a lot about “need” from Europeans.

  4. It’s the same in Peru! I feel like a bull in a china shop when I’m out in public, even after 6 years of living here. Getting on and off of buses is traumatizing for me, and I’m sure also for the people whose faces get a close up view of my back end as I squeeze by.

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